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ABS (Acrylonitrile Butadiene Styrene)
One of the two most common plastics used in the manufacturing of toys and action figures. ABS plastic is generally harder and more brittle than PVC.

Amazonium
Found only on the island of Themyscira, this metal is used in alloys to create extremely strong and lightweight armor. An example of an Amazonium alloy is found in Wonder Woman's bracelets. Referred to as "Feminum" in the television series starring Lynda Carter.

Ares
Ares is based upon the Greek mythological figure of the same name. He is the God of War and a major adversary of Wonder Woman. The comic book encarnation of Ares first appeared in Wonder Woman, Vol. 1, Issue #1 (Summer 1942). In the next issue, he reappeared under his Roman name, Mars and would retain this name until February 1987, when comics writer/artist George Pérez restored the Greek name Ares as part of his reboot of the Wonder Woman mythos. >> Learn More

Artemis
Artemis was a warrior from the Bana-Mighdall, an offshoot of the Amazons who wandered the mortal world and settled in the deserts of Egypt. After they were reunited with the Amazons of Themyscria, Artemis joined the great contest to see who would next take on the role of Wonder Woman. Winning the contest, Artemis was given divine artifacts that enhanced her already prodigious combat abilities and sent out to take the place of Diana in man's world - a challenge that she found unexpectedly difficult, particularly among Diana's friends in the Justice League. Artemis first appeared in Wonder Woman, Vol. 2, Issue #90 (September 1994) and was created by writer William Messner-Loebs and artist Mike Deodato. >> Learn More

Articulation
Movement in a figure

Bronze Age
Comic books published between 1970 - 1984

Cassandra Sandsmark
A fictional character, a DC Comics superheroine. Created by John Byrne, and first appearing in Wonder Woman, Vol. 2, Issue #105 (January 1996), she is the half-human daughter of Zeus. >> Learn more

Cheetah
The Cheetah is the archenemy of Wonder Woman. She first appeared in Wonder Woman, Vol. 1, Issue #6 (October 1943) and was created by writer William Moulton Marston and artist Harry G. Peter. Since then, the character has undergone several updates as comic book continuities have evolved and shifted. There have been four different Cheetahs since the character's premiere, including Priscilla Rich (the Golden Age Cheetah), Deborah Domaine (the Silver Age Cheetah), Barbara Ann Minerva (the modern age and current Cheetah) and Sebastian Ballesteros (a male usurper who briefly assumed the role in 1999). >> Learn More

Circe
A villainous sorceress and major adversary of Wonder Woman based upon the Greek mythological character of the same name who imprisoned Odysseus in Homer's Odyssey. The comic book encarnation of Circe first appeared in Wonder Woman, Vol. 1, Issue #37 (September-October 1949). Throughout the years, various versions of Circe, with various physical appearances, have emerged to challenge the Amazing Amazon. All of these have retained a set of key features: immortality, stunning physical beauty, a powerful command over wicked sorcery, a penchant for turning human beings into animals (like her mythological antecedent), and a delight in humiliation. >> Learn More

Cold-Cast Porcelain
Combining resin and porcelain powder and pouring it into a mold.

Crisis On Infinite Earths
DC Comics 12-issue "maxi-series" and crossover event published in 1985 to simplify continuity. The series was written by Marv Wolfman, and illustrated by George PĂ©rez (pencils/layouts), with Mike DeCarlo, Dick Giordano, and Jerry Ordway, (who shared inking/embellishing chores). The series eliminated the concept of the Multiverse in the fictional DC Universe, and depicted the deaths of such long-standing superheroes as Supergirl and the Barry Allen incarnation of the Flash. Comic book stories and characters are often referred to as "Pre-Crisis" or "Post Crisis" to clarify what incarnation of a character is being referred to.

DC Comics
One of the largest American comic book and related media companies. A subsidiary of Warner Bros. Entertainment since 1969, the initials "DC" came from the company's popular series, Detective Comics, which subsequently became part of the company's official name. Founded originally in 1934 as National Allied Publications. >> Learn More

DC Direct
The exclusive collectibles division of DC Comics that produces statues, props, replicas and prints for the direct market, a distribution and retail network primarily serving comic book specialty stores. DC Direct produces a number of action figures for this market as well, most of which are produced in the 6 to 7-inch scale. >> Learn More

Diana Prince
A fictional character created by Charles Moulton and Harry G. Peter. She serves as the civilian and secret identity of the superhero Wonder Woman. >> Learn more

Diorama
A three-dimentional landscape or scene accompanying a figure or statue, usually as part of the base.

Donna Troy
A fictional character, a superheroine in the DC Universe. Created by Bob Haney and Bruno Premiani and first appearing in The Brave and the Bold, Vol. 1, Issue #60 (July 1965), she was one of the founding members of the Teen Titans. Over the years, her origin story has been changed several times, and she has battled evil under various identities. Her ability to remember the different versions of herself has established her as a living link to the DC Multiverse. She served as Wonder Woman during the year-long absence of her sister Diana following Infinite Crisis. >> Learn more

Epoxy
A two-part bonding agent



Garage Kit
Amateur or semi-professional model kits, usually created in someone's spare time.

Giganta
A longtime enemy of Wonder Woman and an occasional foil for The Atom, Giganta possesses the superhuman ability to increase her physical size and mass, effectively transforming into a giantess. Her first appearance was in Wonder Woman, Vol. 1, Issue #9 (1944) and she was created by writer William Moulton Marston and artist Harry G. Peter. >> Learn More

Golden Age
Comic books published between 1938-1955

Hippolyta
Queen Hippolyta is based on Hippolyte, queen of the Amazons in Greek mythology, and is the mother of Wonder Woman and the adoptive mother of Donna Troy. The comic book encarnation of Hippolyta first appeared in All Star Comics #8 (December 1941). >> Learn More

Injection Molding
A manufacturing process for forming objects, as of plastic or metal, by heating the molding material to a fluid state and injecting it into a two-part mold.

Invisible Plane
The fictional DC Comics superheroine Wonder Woman's venerable, though now seldom-used, mode of transport. It first appeared in Sensation Comics #1 (January 1942). >> Learn More

Justice League / Justice League Unlimited (Animated Series)
Animated television series on Cartoon Network that is based on the Justice League and associated comic book characters published by DC Comics. Justice League aired from November 17, 2001 through February 7, 2004. After its second season, it became Justice League Unlimited, and ran an additional three seasons airing from July 31, 2004 through May 13, 2006.



Lynda Carter
An American actress and singer best known for portraying Wonder Woman in the live-action television series which aired from 1975 to 1979. >> Learn More

Maquette
A reference model for animators.

Modern Age
Comic books published from 1985 - present

Mold
A form in which an object is cast or shaped.

Multiverse
The DC Multiverse is a fictional continuity construct that consists of numerous worlds, most of them outside DC's main continuity allowing writers the creative freedom to explore alternate versions of characters and their histories without contradicting and/or permanently altering the official continuity. After the publication of Infinite Crisis and 52, the Multiverse is again being used in print by DC Comics and consists of fifty-two alternate universes. >> Learn More

Nemesis (Thomas Andrew Tresser)
"Nemesis" first appeared in The Brave and the Bold #166, (September 1980), and was created by Cary Burkett and Dan Spiegle. Thomas Andrew Tresser is a vigilante, turned operative for the U.S. government and a master of disguise. After the events of Infinite Crisis, Nemesis aids government agent Diana Prince (Wonder Woman in disguise) in the rescue of Donna Troy from several of the Amazon's villains. Nemesis is part of the newly re-opened Department of Metahuman Affairs under Sarge Steel. Nemesis was killed in Catwoman #62. >> Learn More


New 52, The
"The New 52" is a September 2011 revamp and relaunch by DC Comics of its entire line of ongoing monthly superhero books, in which all of its existing titles were cancelled, and fifty-two new series debuted in September 2011 with new first issues. Among the major changes to the character, Wonder Woman now appears wearing a new costume similar to her older one, and has a completely new origin. In this new continuity, Wonder Woman is no longer a clay figure brought to life by the magic of the gods, but, the demigodess daughter of Queen Hippolyta and Zeus, King of the Greek Gods. >> Learn More




Pad Printing
Decorative designs, graphics or logos are printed directly onto a product using a silicone rubber pad which is similar to a rubber stamp, but can transfer multiple colors and transfer to relatively uneven surfaces with great detail.

Platinum Age
1837 - 1937

PMS (Pantone Matching System)
The Pantone Matching System (PMS) is a standardized color reproduction system. By standardizing the colors, designers and production facilities in different locations use the Pantone system to make sure colors match exactly regardless of the equipment used. In modern digital printing, CMYK builds of the Pantone color swatches are often substituted to save both time and money.

The 1982 DC Comics Style Guide
shows Wonder Woman's official PMS Colors as:
The 2008 Warner Bros. Consumer Products Art CD
shows Wonder Woman's official PMS Colors as:

Pantone
032

Process Yellow-2

Pantone
285

Pantone
489

Process
Black

Pantone
1795

Pantone
129

Pantone
633

Pantone
7410

Pantone
426

 
The 2001 Justice League Animated Style Guide
shows Wonder Woman's official PMS Colors as:

Pantone
187/188

Pantone
127/131

Pantone
286

Pantone
475/479

Pantone
442/426

Pre-Crisis / Post-Crisis
See: Crisis On Infinite Earths

PVC (Polyvinyl Chloride)
One of the two most common plastics used in the manufacturing of toys and action figures. PVC is a thermoplastic, which means it softens as it is warmed and hardens as it cools.



Redeco
More involved than a simple repaint, something other than the paint scheme has been adjusted.

Repaint
A figure that has been painted in new colors, whether as a production change or to create a new figure.

Resin
A two-part polyester or polyurethane mixture which hardens in a short time.

Rotocast
Liquid material is poured into a mold that is rotated on two axes. The liquid coats the interior walls and solidifies as it cools, creating strong yet thin hollow shapes with smooth interiors.

Scale
Scales are most often calculated using a six-foot tall adult as follows: 1:1 = 72", 1:2 = 36", 1:4 = 18", 1:6 = 12", 1:8 = 9", 1:12 = 6". For example, a standard Barbie Doll measuring 11.5" is modeled in 1:6 scale. Therefore, in real life, she would be 5'9" tall.

Silver Age
Comic books published between 1956 - 1970

Spray Masking
Paint that is applied through an automated process by being sprayed on specific areas of a toy where pre-formed "masks" cover portions that are not to be painted with that color.

Steve Trevor
In the original version of Wonder Woman's origin story, Steve Trevor was an intelligence officer in the United States Army during World War II whose plane crashed in the isolated homeland of the Amazons. He was nursed back to health by the Amazon princess Diana, who fell in love with him and followed him when he returned to the outside world, where she became Wonder Woman (and also his coworker, Diana Prince.) Steve Trevor was portrayed as an American military hero who often fought battles both alone and alongside Wonder Woman. At the same time, he was also a traditional superhero's love interest: repeatedly becoming kidnapped and needing to be rescued by Wonder Woman, as well as pining after the superheroine in the red-and-blue outfit while failing to notice her resemblance to his meek, bespectacled co-worker Diana Prince. >> Learn More

Tampo Printing
See "Pad Printing" above

Tooling (Re-Tooling)
The use of various sculpting and modeling tools in order to prepare a surface for the next step of a process. i.e. shaping, carving, smoothing, sanding, puttying, etc.





Wonder Woman (Character)
A fictional character, a DC Comics superheroine created by William Moulton Marston. First appearing in All Star Comics #8 (December 1941), she is one of three characters to have been continuously published by DC Comics since the company's 1944 inception (except for a brief hiatus in 1984). Wonder Woman is a member of a fictional, all-female tribe of Amazons (based on the Amazons of Greek mythology) who is sent to "man's world" as an ambassador. Among the Amazons she is known as Princess Diana (being the daughter of Amazon queen Hippolyta); in "man's world" she takes the secret identity of "Diana Prince." Her powers include super strength, hand-to-hand combat ability, and sometimes (during the 1980s and 1990s) flight. She also makes use of her Lasso of Truth (which forces those bound by it to tell the truth), a pair of bullet-deflecting bracelets, and an invisible plane. >> Learn more

Wonder Woman (TV Series)
An American television series based on the DC Comics comic book character Wonder Woman, created by William Moulton Marston. It starred Lynda Carter as Princess Diana/Diana Prince and Lyle Waggoner as Steve Trevor. It aired on ABC from 1975-1976 and on CBS from 1977-1979. >> Learn More

Wonder Girl
Three fictional Wonder Girl characters have appeared as superheroines in DC Comics. The original was a younger version of Wonder Woman. The second and third are protégés of Wonder Woman, and members of different incarnations of the Teen Titans - Donna Troy and Cassandra Sandsmark.

Diana: Although not named "Wonder Girl," a young Wonder Woman appeared as part of the character's origin story in All-Star Comics #8 (December 1941), Wonder Woman's first appearance. A teen-aged Princess Diana of the Amazons was featured in a back-story in Wonder Woman, Vol. 1, Issue #23 (May-June 1946). Wonder "Girl" first appeared in "The Secret Origin of Wonder Woman" in Wonder Woman, Vol. 1, Issue #105 (April 1958) and was created by Robert Kanigher. In this revised Silver Age origin, it is established that Diana had in fact not been created from clay, but had been born before the Amazons settled on Paradise Island.
>> Learn more

Donna Troy: A fictional character, a superheroine in the DC Universe. Created by Bob Haney and Bruno Premiani and first appearing in The Brave and the Bold, Vol. 1, Issue #60 (July 1965), she was one of the founding members of the Teen Titans. Over the years, her origin story has been changed several times, and she has battled evil under various identities. Her ability to remember the different versions of herself has established her as a living link to the DC Multiverse. She served as Wonder Woman during the year-long absence of her sister Diana following Infinite Crisis.
>> Learn more

Cassandra Sandsmark: A fictional character, a DC Comics superheroine. Created by John Byrne, and first appearing in Wonder Woman, Vol. 2, Issue #105 (January 1996), she is the half-human daughter of Zeus.
>> Learn more








 
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